Paul Mosse wins O’Malley award

KILKENNY artist Paul Mosses was presented with the presigious O’Malley Art Award at the Butler Gallery last Friday. The honour was bestowed on him by the Irish American Cultural Institute in honour of Ernie O’Malley and Helen Hooker O’Malley

KILKENNY artist Paul Mosses was presented with the presigious O’Malley Art Award at the Butler Gallery last Friday. The honour was bestowed on him by the Irish American Cultural Institute in honour of Ernie O’Malley and Helen Hooker O’Malley

The three-person panel of judges is currently made up of Dr. Roisín Kennedy, History of Art and Cultural Policy, University College Dublin, Anna O’Sullivan, Director of the Butler Gallery, Kilkenny, and Commissioner for Ireland’s entry to the forthcoming Venice Biennale, and Catherine Marshall, Royal Irish Academy, Convener and Chairman of the Committee.

The award, of €5,000 is made to Irish artists who are well-established in their careers, who have made a consistent contribution to the development of art in Ireland over the past decade and who continue to be innovative in their practice.

Paul is originally from Bennettsbridge and is now living near Inistioge with his wife, the American artist Mary Ann Gelly and their two sons. The renowned artist Mosse had an exhibition at the Butler Gallery earlier this year and his work has been collected by the Irish Museum of Modern Art, The Crawford Art Gallery, Dublin City Gallery; The Hugh Lane, Trinity College Dublin, the National Self-Portrait Collection at the University of Limerick, the collections of the major banks, and it can also be found in private collections in Ireland, Britain and the United States of America.

The award is given in honour of Ernie O’Malley, one of the revolutionary leaders in the War of Independence, and later a keen art collector and critical writer. O’Malley was the author of several books dealing with his experiences in the War of Independence and subsequent Civil War, On Another Man’s Wound, The Singing Flame, and Raids and Rallies. Although less well-known for his writing on art he was a close friend of Jack B. Yeats, the painter, about whom he wrote with considerable insight. His American wife, Helen Hooker O’Malley Roelofs was a sculptor and designer, with wide ranging interests in dance and theatre. Her bronze heads of influential Irish men and women are now in the Collection of the University of Limerick.