Kilkenny woman to carry Olympic torch

A KILKENNY native is set to carry the Olympic torch on its journey through England for the London Olympics.

A KILKENNY native is set to carry the Olympic torch on its journey through England for the London Olympics.

Carina Haley is among those selected to carry the torch through Warwick on Sunday.

Now working for England’s National Health Service (NHS), she grew up here, attending school in Crosspatrick, Galmoy and then the vocational school in Johnstown. Her parents, Michael and Kay Doyle, still live in Crosspatrick.

She was nominated for the honour of carrying the Olympic torch by some of the charities with which she volunteers, and also by her husband, her daughter and her daughter’s university friends whom she has “roped into helping with various events.”

Carina is involved in several volunteer efforts, from the local festival committee and fund-raising for Cancer Research UK to volunteering in the Warwickshire Air Ambulance Shop and running half-marathons and 10k races for charity.

“I don’t particularly support just one charity; I spread it around a bit, because they all have a part to play and they all do really good work,” she says.

And she feels it is these groups she will be representing as she carries the Olympic torch on Sunday. “It’s not just me; it’s a whole community that I am involved with, and I feel proud to do it with them,” she says.

It is also a humbling experience, she says, considering the long list of accolades and sporting achievements of the others who are carrying the torch in the weeks leading up to the Olympics.

However, as those who nominated her wrote: “Carina is without doubt a suitable and worthy candidate to be nominated as Olympic Torchbearer. ... Carina works tirelessly and in her spare time, supporting local projects and is simply ‘passionate’ about healthy living and exercise. Her challenging job as a health visitor also involves many initiatives to promote health, nutrition and exercise around the local area. Most of the work above is voluntary and often unrecognised, although much appreciated by the locality.”