Lime Kilns in the spotlight for Heritage Week

One almost overlooked item today in the Irish countryside is the lime kiln. There are only a few people left who would have seen a lime kiln working and fewer still that helped to operate one. So a working lime kiln would be largely unknown to present day people, rural or urban.

One almost overlooked item today in the Irish countryside is the lime kiln. There are only a few people left who would have seen a lime kiln working and fewer still that helped to operate one. So a working lime kiln would be largely unknown to present day people, rural or urban.

In the spirit of Heritage Week, Kilkenny Archaeological Society, Conahy Heritage Society Ltd and Conahy Vintage Club have teamed up to repair and exhibit one of the few remaining working example of a traditional lime kiln, last operated in 1945. The Kiln is on the lands of Michael Bergin, senior and junior and is located by a sizeable outcrop of limestone close to the Ballyragget road in the townland of Ballycarron in Conahy. The techniques and process involved will be clearly demonstrated by a portable model that has been manufactured by Edward M. Byrne of the Traditional Line Company Ltd, Tullow, Co Carlow. This remarkable model will be on site and working during the two days of the demonstrations . Two separate days of demonstrations are planned for the site in Conahy – Wednesday, August 27 commencing at 4.30 until 8.00pm and Saturday August 30 from 2.30 to 7:00 PM. There will also be an extensive display of farm vintage and transport items arranged by Conahy Vintage Club. From Kilkenny take the Castlecomer Road (N78) to the junction with Ballyragget (N78) and about a mile north of Conahy Shamrock’s Club House & Ardaloo cross and a mile south of Foulksrath cross, its where Bergin’s vegetable farm is.