Council agrees taking in charge of Estuary Woods, Maudlin Court

Kilkenny County Council has agreed to take in charge two local housing estates – one of whose developers went into liquidation and another which has been the subject of compliance and enforcement proceedings since 2003.

Kilkenny County Council has agreed to take in charge two local housing estates – one of whose developers went into liquidation and another which has been the subject of compliance and enforcement proceedings since 2003.

The two estates are Estuary Woods in Ferrybank and Maudlin Court (houses 1-23) in Thomastown, both of which were approved for taking in charge at the council’s monthly meeting last week.

It was outlined that the developer of the 15 houses at Estuary Woods, Triangle Developments Ltd, had gone into liquidation on May 29, 2008. With some of the works unfinished at that time, “various (council) departments were asked to outline their costs to complete the outstanding works on the estate with a view to progressing the claim on the bond of €90,000 which had been put in place with Euler Hermes until the estate was taken in charge.”

After negotiations with the project managers for more than a year, the council agreed to accept 85% of the bond, or €72,165, to carry out the needed works.

This does not include a legal transfer of the open space into the council’s ownership, but senior executive office Anne Maria Walsh said that with the developer in liquidation the council “felt the legal costs were too high” to engage in a more protracted negotiation and that “it is quite a small open space anyway.”

She noted that the planning permission requires it to remain an open space into the future.

Regarding Maudlin Court, the council was told that residents of the estate had asked for it to be taken in charge in 2002 and that the estate built by Doheny Developments Ltd had been involved in compliance and enforcement proceedings since 2003.

The developer Paul Doheny died in 2007, however, and the consultant engineers hired to deal with the snag list informed the council in April of this year that Mr Doheny’s widow “had no funds with which to complete the outstanding works.”

The company had been struck off the Company Register in 2010 and the bond of €30,000 had expired in June 2003, according to the council.

The council’s planning department found that “while there are some deficiencies in the infrastructural works within the development, they are not of a significant nature. There are currently no reported problems within the estate and Kilkenny County Council can attend to any remedial works when and if required in the future as part of an ongoing estate maintenance programme.”

The council also said it would provide the promised speed ramps in the estate next year as part of its local roads scheme.