Father’s anger of a lost generation

A KILKENNY business owner and father has spoken of his shame that his generation did not stand up and react to the property bubble before the economy crashed.

A KILKENNY business owner and father has spoken of his shame that his generation did not stand up and react to the property bubble before the economy crashed.

56-year-old Jim Harding from Gowran said goodbye to his 24-year-old son James last week who has emigrated to Sydney in Australia. “I am annoyed that I didn’t stand up at the time. I should have spoken up. I am angry that I had to say goodbye to my son and that my generation did this for greed and money.

“I think that the worst off generation are those aged between 25 and 45 who have walked into slavery. I personally knew back in 2005 and 2006 that we were in a bubble and the Government should have done something.

“My son, who is a qualified fitter has moved to Australia. I could probably provide him with a living but I couldn’t guarantee him a good living. I think that he could have got a job here but if you’re looking for a career and a future then the only option for a lot of youngsters is Australia and Canada.

“It absolutely sickens me what we have done to them. We are a small country with hige resources but it is a case of the same old corruption and cronyism. I think that the politicans out there for the most part don’t have a bulls notion and the best politicans of the future are sitting in small houses around the country. These are the people who should be getting into politics instead of the people who are currently in politics. When I was at the airport with my son I saw droves of young people with nothing apart from a few quid in their pocket and a bag on their back. I think that it is absolutely disgusting,” he said.

Mr Harding in a piece of writing posted on social networking site Facebook said that he is ‘sick of a civil service who`s management stood by because they did not have the ability to see that our country was being hijacked by “professionals” who put instant profit before the good of its own people, and who in spite of all the changes are still in place to attempt to resurrect our economy with as little foresight today as they had then’. He also criticised the bankers who he said ‘played games of profiteering with the lives of those who wished simply to settle down in their house to live a decent life but ended up enslaved to these same bankers employers’.