Monday’s Child - review

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The concept of self and identity and the fragility of our existence through the passage of time is beautifully explored in Barnstorm Theatre Company’s Monday’s Child.

The concept of self and identity and the fragility of our existence through the passage of time is beautifully explored in Barnstorm Theatre Company’s Monday’s Child.

The play written by Brendan Murray is for children aged four upwards and is magically created through both the script and a series of dream like dances.

The scene is a walled garden where a young girl plays and searches for treasures and is joined by an older woman who has visited before but cannot remember.

As the woman struggles and fails to remember the audience are struck by fleeting moments of sadness as the character becomes stressed trying to capture moments that are passed and no longer of importance or significance to her well being.

However the darker moments are outshone by the playful exuberance both characters enjoy as they open box after box of memories and treasure. The more the they live and play in the moment the closer they become to merging into the one and as the play approaches it’s end it is apparent that both are in fact the one person.

There are universal themes that are deftly woven into this stunning piece of theatre - aging, mortality, the passing of time.

In one of the closing moments of the play the older lady looks into a mirror and seeing her aged self asks the younger girl ‘when did this happen’. ‘It must have been when you were not looking,’ replies the young girl. Food for thought indeed.