New laws to prevent horses in waterways and anti-social behaviour in parks, playgrounds

Horses will not be allowed in public parks and adjoining waterways when new bye-laws from Kilkenny County Council come into effect next month.

Horses will not be allowed in public parks and adjoining waterways when new bye-laws from Kilkenny County Council come into effect next month.

In parks, playgrounds, sports pitches, recreational play areas and multi-use games areas owned or controlled by the council, it will not be allowed for a person to “lead, walk or ride a horse in a park or allow themselves to be conveyed by a horse-drawn vehicle.”

It will also not be allowed to “exercise or allow any horse to enter any watercourse of any park and watercourses adjacent to any park”.

Similarly, it will not be allowed for cattle, sheep, horse or any other animal to turn out to graze or stray in a park.

Anyone bringing a dog into a park “shall prevent it from causing annoyance to any person using the park or ... disturbing any animals, birds or other creatures in the park.”

Human behaviour is also outlined in the Kilkenny County Council Parks Bye-Laws, which are due to come into force on November 21 after having been approved at Monday’s council meeting.

The regulations include that no person may trample on any flower bed, destroy any tree, climb any tree or shrub in the park, take from the park or injure any bird, bird’s nest or bird’s eggs, “molest, menace, threaten or otherwise interfere with” any person using the park, remove any soil, sand, gravel, stone or timber without permission, litter, bring into the park “any firearm, airgun, catapult or any other weapon”, or use bonfires, fires, barbecues or fireworks without permission.

The penalty for offences against these bye-laws is a fine of up to e1,905, and anyone who “repeatedly contravenes” the bye-laws can be barred from a park.

Travellers as ethnic group

On the subject of Travellers, Cllr Malcolm Noonan (Greens) proposed a motion at Monday’s council meeting asking the council to call on the Government “to recognise Travellers as a distinct ethnic group as recommended by the UN Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, thereby bringing the Traveller community into the ambit of various protections in international agreements and within the Irish state.”

However, the motion did not pass as it was not seconded by any other members present. Some of the other councillors proposed that the motion either be discussed by the council’s committee on Travellers or by the Association of County and City Councils.