Kilmacow and Mooncoin helping those with Marfan’s Syndrome

Marfan’s Research Foundation in Ireland originated in the Mooncoin/Kilmacow area of the south of the county. It was set up by family and friends of the McGrath family from Kilmacow who are directly affected by Marfan Syndrome. The Marfan’s Research Foundation was set up to raise funds for research on the cause and treatment of Marfan Syndrome and also to raise awareness of this condition.

Marfan’s Research Foundation in Ireland originated in the Mooncoin/Kilmacow area of the south of the county. It was set up by family and friends of the McGrath family from Kilmacow who are directly affected by Marfan Syndrome. The Marfan’s Research Foundation was set up to raise funds for research on the cause and treatment of Marfan Syndrome and also to raise awareness of this condition.

The funds raised are directly channelled through Professor Mark Redmond, Thoracic Cardiac Surgeon, Mater Hospital, Dublin and Our Ladies Childrens Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin. Professor Redmond successfully performed cardiac surgery on Geraldine, Kieran and Sean McGrath from Kilmacow together with numerous other Irish Marfan patients. He has gained vast experience in treating Marfan patients from his work at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, USA.

The Marfans Research Foundation has a dedicated committee who share many skills. These combined talents have achieved enormous success to date. The Foundation enjoys tremendous support from the public – private individuals and the corporate sector alike. The willingness with which people respond is encouraging and uplifting. The Marfans Research Foundation Committee is confident that as treatment for Marfans improves and patients are successfully treated, there will be other fundraisers nationwide. This committee is willing to advise any person in this direction and give any assistance necessary.

Marfan’s syndrome is a genetic disorder of the connective tissue. People with Marfan tend to be unusually tall, with long limbs and long, thin fingers. Marfan syndrome has a range of expressions, from mild to severe. The most serious complications are defects of the heart valves and aorta. It may also affect the lungs, the eyes, the dural sac surrounding the spinal cord, the skeleton and the hard palate.