Kilkenny Dyson Engineer returns to Ireland to launch James Dyson Award

Senior Dyson engineer Patrick Moloney from Ballyhale returned to Ireland last month to launch the 2013 James Dyson Award to third level design and engineering students across the country. Moloney was the first Irish winner of the award in 2004 with his lightweight cast for broken limbs. He returned to Ireland to promote the competition and encourage young Irish inventors.

Senior Dyson engineer Patrick Moloney from Ballyhale returned to Ireland last month to launch the 2013 James Dyson Award to third level design and engineering students across the country. Moloney was the first Irish winner of the award in 2004 with his lightweight cast for broken limbs. He returned to Ireland to promote the competition and encourage young Irish inventors.

James Dyson is once again challenging Kilkenny students at Kilkenny IT to ‘design something that solves a problem’. The design icon has spoken highly of students who have entered from Ireland “There have always been a disproportionately high number of entries from Ireland, high-quality ones too.” Budding designers from Kilkenny IT can now submit their entries into the 2013 international James Dyson Award. James Dyson wants to encourage the next generation of design students to be creative, innovative and unique. This year the total prize fund has doubled to €110,000.The grand prize for the international winner of the 2013 James Dyson Award has been increased from€11,500 to €35,000 along with a James Dyson Award Certificate and a James Dyson Award trophy. Meanwhile the international winner will receive a further €11,500 for their institution.

Two international runners-up will receive a cheque for €11,500 each along with a James Dyson award certificate. These significant prizes are very much within Irish students’ reach considering student inventors from the University of Limerick and Carlow IT have made the top 15 in the world three times over the past four years.

The prize for the national winner in each participating country, including Ireland, has also doubled from €1,150 to €2,300. National winners will also receive an award certificate.

The increased prize fund is recognition of the fact that developing an invention is very expensive. The prize money is intended to go some of the way the helping with prototyping, patenting and further developing the ideas.

Now in its tenth year, the award is open to any third level students of product design, industrial design and engineering, or graduates within four years of graduation. Entries close on the 1st August 2013. Entrants can submit footage, images and sketches of their ideas to the website www.jamesdysonaward.org, along with stories detailing their design process and inspiration. Their ideas will be scrutinised by judges around the world and Dyson engineers before James Dyson announces the international winner on 7th November.

Entries from Ireland will be competing with hundreds of ideas from 18 other countries to claim the £30,000 (€35,000) prize. Entries can be uploaded directly to the website http://www.jamesdysonaward.org