Improvement in quality of drinking water in Kilkenny

The quality of Kilkenny’s drinking water is improving, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

The quality of Kilkenny’s drinking water is improving, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

In 2010, drinking water in the county achieved 100% compliance with “microbiological parameters” – an increase in quality from 99.7% the previous year – and 99.4% compliance with chemical limits, which is consistent with 2009.

For human health, the microbiological parameters are the most important, as they can indicate a potential risk – in particular E. coli, which indicates that human or animal waste has entered a water supply. Chemical parameters are also important as long-term exposure can cause a potential risk to human health.

There were eight Kilkenny public water supplies on the EPA’s Remedial Action List at the end of 2010, but two others were removed from the list during the year – the Kilkenny City (Troyswood) and Urlingford/ Johnstown PWS – due to the completion of remedial works to the satisfaction of the EPA.

The findings were outlined in an EPA report on The Provision and Quality of Drinking Water in Ireland: A Report for the Year 2010. The report assesses the safety and security of drinking water supplies.

“No non-compliance of the microbiological parametric values occurred in 2010,” according to the EPA, and “no boil water notices or water restriction notices were issued to consumers during 2010 and none remained active from previous years.”

It also points out that chlorine monitors and alarms were in place on all Kilkenny County Council PWS by the end of 2010.

Kilkenny County Council is responsible for the operation of 20 public water supplies (PWS) serving a population of 63,987, the report notes.