Tory Hill - faxcts and fallacies

Dear Editor,

Dear Editor,

In reply to Richard Cramptons letter of 13/07/12 I would like to recount the origin of this correspondence; Sean Keanes article “Tory Hill and the Greeks” in which he suggested a Greek presence on the hill in 4000 B.C. Both title and suggestion were based solely on the discovery by William Tighe of “an altar stone bearing a Pelasgian Greek inscription” there around 1800 A.D.

In Richard’s letter of 15/06/12 he praised Sean for refreshing our knowledge of Tory Hills “Pelasgian Aegean Connections” and finished by proclaiming “Kilkenny legend and Irish science meet atop Tory Hill!”

In my letter of 06/07/12, I explained that Tighes fallacious discovery was debunked by Greaves and O’Donovan around 1850 A.D. The “Pelasgian Greek” stonecarver, Ned Conic, had set forth, not from some far-flung Aegean shore, but more likely from a pub in Mullinavat where he headed for the hilltop and “altared” the known history of civilization! (anything can happen when a ‘Vat man runs out of beer money). The full account can be read in the Journal of the Kilkenny Archaeological Society 1849 - 51.

I welcome - Richard’s information on other links between ancient Greece and various parts of Ireland which he expanded on in his second letter. It is very interesting and important in its own right though not specific to the subject in question - Tory Hills Pelasgian Greek connections or lack thereof.

There may be several ancient Grecian-Irish links, and of course, Tighes blunder does not impinge on any of them. But if there is any connection between ancient Greece and Tory Hill it has yet to be discovered and established.

If Richard is correct in his latest assertions, Kilkenny Grecian legend and Irish science may have met in Dunmore: They have yet to meet on Tory Hill.

yours Sincerely

Seamus Davis