Injury forces Dowling to quit rugby

A SERIOUS injury has finished the career of Munster rugby star, Ian Dowling.

A SERIOUS injury has finished the career of Munster rugby star, Ian Dowling.

The Kilkenny man shattered his hip in a horrific tackle during a Magners League game, and after a six month battle to save his career he admitted defeat yesterday, writes John Knox.

“My career is over,” Dowling told the ’People shortly before Munster released an official statement confirming the worst news any professional can hear.

During a short but distinguished career with Munster, the 28-year-old won two Heineken Cups (2006 and 2008), which are the equivalent of a European club championship, and he earned two caps with Ireland.

All going well, Ian Dowling would have been chasing a place in Declan Kidney’s squad for the rugby World Cup this season.

However, on September 19 last fate dealt the flying winger a cruel blow that was to end his career. He suffered a chipped bone in the socket on his left hip during a Magners League game against Ospreys.

After treatment by the top orthopaedic surgeon in England whose speciality was hip reconstruction, and getting the views of leading consultants in France and other parts of Europe, Dowling had finally to admit defeat.

“I lived the dream with Munster, so in some ways I was very, very lucky,” Dowling said when putting a brave face on things.

“If someone made the offer at the start and told me it would end quickly but I would win so much in a short time I would have snapped the hand off them.

“It is not easy, but I will have to move on with my life,” he continued. “I won’t dwell on the negatives. I intend to move on to the next challenge in life and to become the best I can be at whatever I end up doing.”

He always insisted that becoming a professional athlete had been his dream in life. He learned so much through his involved with Munster and Ireland, and he was sure those lessons would serve him well in the future.

See full exclusive interview in this week’s Kilkenny People.