Windgap/Tullahought - Robberies, break-ins and unsociable activity

NO PEACE AND TRANQUILLITY IN THE HILLS OR VALLEYS ANYMORE - Recent robberies, break-ins and unsociable activities are turning out to be life changing events for members of local communities. Nowadays every person has a poignant personal story of such an event, or knows of a neighbour, relative or friend who has been effected in some way. For them it comes in various forms, the theft of hard earned euros no matter how small, a family heirloom often handed down through generations, or a hard saved for commodity such as a TV camera or computer. For others it is badly needed and expensive to replace heating oil, work tools or a time saving quad or piece of farm machinery. On the list too are schools, shops and businesses where the long term effects are similarly felt. For all it is the violation of their homes, space and premises that remains long after the event along with the added fear of a return visit. With many having been hit not once, but several times, the Cromwellian or Famine style wave that is sweeping the country has confined many people indoors with little or no social contact. Family events that were once community celebrations such as holiday’s, weddings and parties are now only whispered about in fear the word will be out that the house is unoccupied. In an era of improved communications with twitter, face book and email replacing the traditional personal interaction of visits to the local pub, school, shop or outside the church, security gated houses are adding to the isolation of those inside and their neighbours outside. For many living alone being unemployed or a pensioner in tough economic times or being a parent wishing to travel abroad to meet emigrated family members or assisting a homecoming it means they cannot afford sufficient security to doors and windows or an alarm system. Recent cases have shown the organization and brazenness of the robbers that was once only to be seen on a Hollywood or James Bond set as no residence appears safe no matter how well it is protected. For many the trip to town is now a challenge as unoccupied houses are regularly raided within a short time of the residents departure. In addition it creates unnecessary fear, tension, sleeplessness and associated health issues with some incidences now going unreported. Adding to scenario is the cases where people have encountered their possessions being up for sale or being sold in public in nearby towns and cities. The rising trend of breaking and entering continually shocks visitors from abroad, particularly from cities and lesser developed countries who have long since dealt with their spiralling rates of crime and had the idea Ireland was ever effected until they hear and see its current extent.

NO PEACE AND TRANQUILLITY IN THE HILLS OR VALLEYS ANYMORE - Recent robberies, break-ins and unsociable activities are turning out to be life changing events for members of local communities. Nowadays every person has a poignant personal story of such an event, or knows of a neighbour, relative or friend who has been effected in some way. For them it comes in various forms, the theft of hard earned euros no matter how small, a family heirloom often handed down through generations, or a hard saved for commodity such as a TV camera or computer. For others it is badly needed and expensive to replace heating oil, work tools or a time saving quad or piece of farm machinery. On the list too are schools, shops and businesses where the long term effects are similarly felt. For all it is the violation of their homes, space and premises that remains long after the event along with the added fear of a return visit. With many having been hit not once, but several times, the Cromwellian or Famine style wave that is sweeping the country has confined many people indoors with little or no social contact. Family events that were once community celebrations such as holiday’s, weddings and parties are now only whispered about in fear the word will be out that the house is unoccupied. In an era of improved communications with twitter, face book and email replacing the traditional personal interaction of visits to the local pub, school, shop or outside the church, security gated houses are adding to the isolation of those inside and their neighbours outside. For many living alone being unemployed or a pensioner in tough economic times or being a parent wishing to travel abroad to meet emigrated family members or assisting a homecoming it means they cannot afford sufficient security to doors and windows or an alarm system. Recent cases have shown the organization and brazenness of the robbers that was once only to be seen on a Hollywood or James Bond set as no residence appears safe no matter how well it is protected. For many the trip to town is now a challenge as unoccupied houses are regularly raided within a short time of the residents departure. In addition it creates unnecessary fear, tension, sleeplessness and associated health issues with some incidences now going unreported. Adding to scenario is the cases where people have encountered their possessions being up for sale or being sold in public in nearby towns and cities. The rising trend of breaking and entering continually shocks visitors from abroad, particularly from cities and lesser developed countries who have long since dealt with their spiralling rates of crime and had the idea Ireland was ever effected until they hear and see its current extent.

CAMOGIE - In Allana Dunphys weekly report on underage camogie activities this weeks story reports on Windgap’s under fourteen camogie championship tie in Galmoy on Wednesday. On their visit the side recorded a fine win over St Anne’s as Molly Walsh scored 2-4, Margaret Purcell 1-1, Margaret Foley 1-2 and Gillian Costello with a goal got the scores as they were well supplied with a fine supply of the ball by the rest of the team.

HURLING NEWS - The sides double bill with Slieverue at Junior and Junior “B” level was postponed at the weekend following the death of Paddy Buggy. Paddy was a former GAA President, Leinster and Kilkenny County Board Chairman and All Ireland winning player against Waterford in 1957.

HEALTHY FOOD - The school building fund Healthy Food Fair takes place in Windgap Community Hall on this Saturday 25th May 2013 12 – 4 pm. It will include the Launch of the Windgap National School book of Healthy Lunch Recipes and a Cookery Demonstration with Anne Neary. Presentations on the day will include - Food for Life by Mr Abbas Ghadimi. Avoiding Food Waste by Bernadette Moloney Kilkenny Co Co Environmental Awareness Officer. Also included will be Food Stalls, Raffle,Tea, Coffee, Refreshments. Admission is €5 per adult, Kids are Free and all are very welcome

GATHERING AWAY - Do you have old photographs or items of memorabilia for the Gathering exhibition in The League House?. If so please contact Tess Cross, Kate Moloney or any committee member.

WINDGAP BOYS - The under 10 boys travelled to Galmoy on Saturday last and played the locals in the Go Games league. On the day Windgap started well scoring with an early goal to set them on their way as they recorded a 5-3 to 1-3 win. Their next match will take place in Nowlan Park.

COMMUNITY ALERT - A community alert meeting will take place in Windgap Community Centre on this Wednesday 22nd May at 8.00p.m. The agenda will include the creation of a text messaging system in the area. All are invited to attend.

STUDENTS EXAMS - A mass for all students sitting exams will be celebrated in St. Nicholas’ Church, Windgap on Sunday next 2nd June at 10.00 a.m.

PLAYGROUND NEWS - Clare Goodwin of Kilkenny County Council met Fr. Nicholas Flavin, Marie Hayes, Matt Doran and Jimmy Walsh at the proposed site of a new playground on Tuesday morning last. The group were representing the Planning for the Future Committee, The Parish, School Parents, the elected members of the County Council and the Windgap Community Development committee. Amazed at the beauty of the setting on a split level site surrounded by trees, water and the areas sporting educational and social facilities Clare offered the full support of the council and advised the group on how to advance the project. Adding to the ambience was the sound and sight of the school children scattered on three different play areas during their morning break. In addition the air was full of birdsong and the fragrances of the fresh growth of summer and the newly cut grass as local volunteers George Watters and Dermot Houlihan were busy manicuring the grass area around the lake.

PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE - The smallest attendance to date was present at the latest Planning for the Future meeting held in the GAA Clubrooms on Tuesday evening. In a long agenda, the repairs and renovations to the Creamery Store, The Gathering event from 21st – 23rd June were discussed. Also the repairs to Tullahought and Windgap Churches, the roof of the presbytery in Windgap and the low voltage ESB supply in Tullahought. Also debated in depth were the proposed Playground Development, the tennis court and the re-development of the Hall in Windgap. Getting an airing on the night was the proposed amalgamation of walkways where a fantastic offer of the cost free construction of a linking path has been made. Completing the long list was the feedback on an all weather playing area. Missing owing to possible time constrictions was the updates on the widening of the gates into the Car Park at the church in Windgap and the proposed cleaning of the statutes in the Grotto in time for the gathering. Owing to space constrictions further details will follow on each item in the coming weeks..The next meeting was fixed for Tuesday 18th June at 8.30pm.