Defence barrister suggests Kilkenny accused was trying to wrestle knife from nephew

Trial continues this afternoon before Mr Justice Paul Butler and a jury of six men and six women

Natasha Reid

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Natasha Reid

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CRIMINAL COURTS

Tadhg Butler, with an address at Seafield in Tramore, is accused of murdering 25-year-old Michael O’Dwyer on 10th January 2014. He has pleaded not guilty

The barrister for a Kilkenny man charged with murdering another man in his home has suggested that his client was trying to wrestle the knife from his self-harming nephew when it entered the deceased man’s chest.

Michael Bowman SC was cross examining his client’s nephew this (Thursday) morning in the Central Criminal Court trial of a 37-year-old a father of five, charged with murdering that nephew’s friend in County Waterford.

Tadhg Butler, with an address at Seafield in Tramore, is accused of murdering 25-year-old Michael O’Dwyer on 10th January 2014. He has pleaded not guilty.

Denis Vaughan Buckley SC, prosecuting, this morning read out the statement made later that day by Mr Butler’s nephew, Tony O’Grady. He told the gardai that his uncle had simply walked up to the deceased and stuck a butcher’s knife into his chest during a party in Mr Butler’s home.

However, the 25-year-old told the court that he had no recollection of giving that statement or of any of the events from that time, as he was on medication for mental disorders and was a drug addict at the time.

Under cross examination by Mr Bowman, he agreed that his client had previously wrestled implements from him to prevent him self-harming. He agreed that he would have been upset that night as it was approaching the anniversary of the death of his only sibling, who had died of a drug overdose outside a Dublin takeaway.

He agreed that he could have taken a knife from the kitchen with the intention of harming himself, and could have said that he wanted to end it all. He agreed that his uncle could have tried to intervene and that he could have resisted.

“And he (the accused) struggled to take the knife off you, and he forcibly pulled the knife out of your hand in circumstances where Mr O’Dwyer was standing beside him or behind him and the knife went into him?” suggested Mr Bowman. “Could that be possible. Could it reasonably be true?”

“Yes, it could, but I’ve no recollection,” agreed Mr O’Grady.

The trial continues this afternoon before Mr Justice Paul Butler and a jury of six men and six women.