Kilkenny Castle to Light Up in Teal for World Ovarian Cancer Day

Sian Moloughney

Reporter:

Sian Moloughney

Email:

sian.moloughney@kilkennypeople.ie

Kilkenny Kilkenny Kilkenny

Kilkenny Castle will be lit up in teal this evening for World Ovarian Cancer Day

On World Ovarian Cancer Day, today, 8th May, an impressive array of Ireland’s public buildings and landmarks are lighting up in teal, the signature colour of the campaign to fight ovarian cancer throughout the world.

 

Generously agreeing to ‘Light Up in Teal’ in support of this global initiative are Kilkenny Castle; City Hall, Cork; Convention Centre, Dublin; East Galway and Midlands Cancer Support Centre, Ballinasloe, Co. Galway; Heuston Station, Dublin;  National Concert Hall, Dublin; National University of Ireland, Galway; Pearse Lyons Distillery, Dublin; University College Cork.

 

World Ovarian Cancer Day is a global movement bringing women living with ovarian cancer, their families and supporters, patient advocacy organisations, medical practitioners and researchers together to raise awareness of ovarian cancer.   This is the 6th most commonly diagnosed female cancer in Ireland. Approximately 441 women are diagnosed each year with 279 women losing their lives due to the disease. Ireland ranks among the highest in the world in terms of mortality from ovarian cancer.  

Early diagnosis and treatment are vital and campaigners hope that the Light Up in Teal campaign will provide a timely reminder to women not to ignore the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer.  Even in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, women should consult with their GP’s if they have persistent bloating, abdominal or pelvic pain; changes in urination, bowel or eating habits including eating less and/or feeling full more quickly.  

 

Raising our voices in solidarity in Ireland are Breakthrough Cancer Research, Cancer Trials Ireland, East Galway and Midlands Cancer Support Centre, Emer Casey Foundation, Irish Cancer Society, Irish Society of Gynaecological Oncology, Karen Fenton Ovarian Cancer Fund, Lynch Syndrome Ireland, Marie Keating Foundation, National Cancer Control Programme, OvaCare, SOCK, St. James’ Hospital Foundation (GynaeCancerCare) and Trinity College Dublin.